Nursing Assistant Training

Diploma Program

Our Certified Nursing Assistant diploma program is a self-paced, hybrid program that includes online learning, a flexible classroom commitment, and a clinical externship in an Agency for Healthcare Administration (AHCA) licensed skilled nursing facility. This program is licensed by the Florida Department of Education. It is also approved by the Department of Labor and the Florida Board of Nursing.

Using this route, CNA students are exempt from clinical skills exam for CNA licensure as well awarded a CNA licensure for multi-state reciprocity.

Reciprocity is a state-to-state agreement allowing CNA licensees to transfer their CNA license without going through the entire certification process in the new state.

Cost & Fees

Additional Details
Our Board of Nursing approved CNA program combines online learning and hands-on learning to teach and expand on nursing assistant concepts and clinical skills. The Board of Nursing approved program will culminate with a clinical externship in an Agency for Healthcare Administration (AHCA) licensed skilled nursing facility. Using this route, successful program candidates are exempt from the clinical skills exam for CNA licensure as well awarded a CNA licensure for multi-state reciprocity.   Note: Reciprocity is a state-to-state agreement allowing CNA licensees to transfer their CNA license without going through the entire certification process in the new state.
Cost & Fees
CNA Diploma Cost Break Down Cost and Fees
Registration Fee: $50 (Due at the time of registration)
Learning Management System Tuition: $575
Level 2 Background and State Testing Fee $250
Total: $875
Topics
Certified nursing assistants, also known as CNAs, are a source of great emotional and physical support and provide hands-on health care under the supervision of a licensed nurse. CNAs provide help and support with activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing, feeding, taking vital signs, and reporting observations to the nurse. Not only do CNAs provide care to the geriatric population in a skilled nursing, home health, or assisted living setting, CNAs also provide direct care to individuals in hospice, government facilities such as the VA, and even in private practices and clinics. Some CNAs also work with nurse registries as independent caregivers; as oncology technicians, providing support to cancer patients; as a patient care technician, also known as PCT, working in a hospital setting; or as dialysis technicians, providing support for live-saving kidney care.
Sample Knowledge and Clinical Skill Topics
  • Expanded Role of the Nursing Assistant
  • Infection and Infection Control
  • Common Disorders and Related Care Procedures
  • Special Care Procedures
  • Human Development
  • Nutritional Needs
  • Safety, Mobility, and Patient Care Measures
  • Promotion of Function and Health of Residents
Requirements
If you are at least 18 years old, a high school diploma or GED is not required. In order to qualify for licensure, you must also pass a background screening in accordance with Sections 435.04, 435.07, and 408.809, FS or qualify for an Exemption from Disqualification.